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Navy Seabee Veterans of American - Guestbook





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I'm a charter member of the Pueblo, CO. Island X-2. I served with such units as: NMCB-7, NMCB-1, NMCB-8, CBMU-301, RNMCB-15, RNMCB-17, RNMCB-23, and RNCFSU-2

Added: May 17, 2010
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I would like to hear from anyone from ncb#5 station in Dung Ha , Viet Nam during 1966 and 1968. I was a third class Petty Officer , Heavy equipment opperator. Some of my buddies were Alex Carestio from Cherry Hill New Jersey and Bob Ramp from Chicago.

Added: May 17, 2010
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served from 76-81 nmcb 133 sw-3, looking for kent beam, dean gerber, fred griffon, jim ryan

Added: May 16, 2010
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I would love to hear from any Seabee who was based in Wellington New Zealand in 1942/43 and who may have met my mother Joanne (Jo) Maddock (since deceased). If you think you may have known Jo, it would mean a lot to me to hear from you - regards Robyn

Added: May 12, 2010
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Looking for buddies from the 84th NCB.

Added: May 11, 2010
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My Dad, Robert Jeys, served in the South Pacific in WW II and always told us he was a Seabee, but didn't really say much more about his experiences (no big surprise there!) Anyway, I got his Navy records and they say he was at the training center in Great Lakes, IL, and then went to Naval Training School at Purdue University in Lafayette, Indiana. It says he completed the "EM" (Electrician's Mate?) school after 16 weeks. Eventually he shipped out from Camp Shoemaker (now Camp Parks) in California on the USS Joseph T. Dickman in January 1945, and was assigned to N.A.B. Navy 145 (I think this was Guadalcanal) from March to August 1945. Then it shows he went to Sect. Base, Navy 1170 SLCU #40 (I think this was at Okinawa) until January 1946. He held AS, F2c and F1c ratings. Can anyone tell me anything else about what all of this means and if he was a Seabee or not? Thanks!

Added: May 10, 2010
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This is the 65th anniversary of the Okinawa invasion. I wonder how many Seebee buddies are still living and remember those days

Added: May 8, 2010
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Looking for anyone from the 87th NCB - served in Okinawa from 1943-1945.

Added: May 6, 2010
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Looking for anyone from the 87th NCB - served in Okinawa from 1943-1945.

Added: May 6, 2010
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Comments:
You're a 19 year old kid.
You're critically wounded and dying in the jungle somewhere in the Central Highlands of Viet Nam .

It's November 11, 1967.
LZ (landing zone) X-ray.

Your unit is outnumbered 8-1 and the enemy fire is so intense, from 100 yards away, that your CO (commanding officer) has ordered the MediVac helicopters to stop coming in.

You're lying there, listening to the enemy machine guns and you know you're not getting out.
Your family is half way around the world, 12,000 miles away, and you'll never see them again.

As the world starts to fade in and out, you know this is the day.

Then - over the machine gun noise - you faintly hear that sound of a helicopter.
You look up to see a Huey coming in. But ... It doesn't seem real because no Medi-Vac markings are on it.

Captain Ed Freeman is coming in for you.

He's not Medi-Vac so it's not his job, but he heard the radio call and decided he's flying his Huey down into the machine gun fire anyway.

Even after the Medi-Vacs were ordered not to come.
He's coming anyway.

And he drops it in and sits there in the machine gun fire, as they load 3 of you at a time on board.
Then he flies you up and out through the gunfire to the doctors and nurses and safety.

And, he kept coming back!! 13 more times!! Until all the wounded were out. No one knew until the mission was over that the Captain had been hit 4 times in the legs and left arm.

He took 29 of you and your buddies out that day. Some would not have made it without the Captain and his Huey.


Medal of Honor Recipient, Captain Ed Freeman, United States Air Force, died last Wednesday at the age of 70, in Boise , Idaho .

May God Rest His Soul.

I bet you didn't hear about this hero's passing, but we've sure seen a whole bunch about Michael Jackson and Tiger Woods.




Medal of Honor Winner
Captain Ed Freeman

Shame on the American media !!!

Now ... YOU pass this along on YOUR mailing list.

Please.


Added: May 4, 2010
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